Robot Update: Cirque de Robopacolypse

Tightrobot

 

by Douglas Black, enerficiency, October 22, 2012

Now we have Cirque De Robot.  Here is a bi-pedal robot so agile it walks a tightrope.

From our friends at Gizmag;

A Japanese roboticist that goes by the handle Dr. Guero, famous for programming his hobby robot to ride a miniature bicycle and walk on stilts, has managed to get his robot to balance on a tightrope. His Primer-V4 robot is based on the Kondo KHR-3HV hobby kit (which can be purchased for around US$1,800), but features a few modifications that give it the ability to inch its way along a steel wire just over an eighth of an inch (4 mm) thick.

Tightrope Robot

The following video shows Dr. Guero’s robot as it slides its way along the wire, making minute adjustments to its balance by waving its arms. On his website, Dr. Guero explains that the robot’s arms move in different directions based on signals from its inclination sensor. He had to modify the feet by adding grooves to help catch the wire – which seems like a fair modification given that human performers will use their toes to do the same thing. He also replaced the standard arms with ones that have fewer servos and parts to provide better balance.

Dr. Guero (aka Masahiko Yamaguchi) has worked at some prestigious labs, including Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Boston Dynamics, and Osaka University. His nickname, chosen by his wife, comes from the long-running comic and animated television show Dragon Ball Z, whose Dr. Gero is an evil scientist behind the Red Ribbon Androids. You can watch the tightrope trick below, and check out his earlier projects on his website.

****((

Now we have Cirque De Robot.  Here is a bi-pedal robot so agile it walks a tightrope.

From our friends at Gizmag;

A Japanese roboticist that goes by the handle Dr. Guero, famous for programming his hobby robot to ride a miniature bicycle and walk on stilts, has managed to get his robot to balance on a tightrope. His Primer-V4 robot is based on the Kondo KHR-3HV hobby kit (which can be purchased for around US$1,800), but features a few modifications that give it the ability to inch its way along a steel wire just over an eighth of an inch (4 mm) thick.

The following video shows Dr. Guero’s robot as it slides its way along the wire, making minute adjustments to its balance by waving its arms. On his website, Dr. Guero explains that the robot’s arms move in different directions based on signals from its inclination sensor. He had to modify the feet by adding grooves to help catch the wire – which seems like a fair modification given that human performers will use their toes to do the same thing. He also replaced the standard arms with ones that have fewer servos and parts to provide better balance.

Dr. Guero (aka Masahiko Yamaguchi) has worked at some prestigious labs, including Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Boston Dynamics, and Osaka University. His nickname, chosen by his wife, comes from the long-running comic and animated television show Dragon Ball, whose Dr. Gero is an evil scientist behind the Red Ribbon Androids. You can watch the tightrope trick below, and check out his earlier projects on his website.

*****

Douglas Black

Mr. Black is a high performance car enthusiast, always with an ear to the pavement for what’s fast and new.  He began blogging enerficiency On The Road in 2001, and now continues reporting from Auto Shows and Swap Meets at his Hot Flying Rats! blog – flyingratz.wordpress.com

He also uses his MagicEightBall to predict sporting outcomes and shares on his blog M8B4Cast.wix.com/sportsblog.

Photography is a lifelong passion for Douglas Black, and while not capturing enthusiastic smiles at Wrigley Field he captures moments in the built environment.

And in his spare time, he works on getting that Captains License, expecting to retire on the water one day, taking photos.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s